Saturday, February 5, 2011

UN affiliated OIPA chapter in India and PFA Haryana demands legislations for Police and Indian Military - Forces dogs / animals.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d5/BelgianMalinoisasK9unit.jpg
Dogs are also treated as a solders, while on Police duty and there may be dress, equipments to protect dogs from bullets, other kinds of injuries, rules to keep them well along with legislation, rehabilitation as well after retirement, because there are no rules and legislation's for Police animals in India.

THE PREVENTION OF

CRUELTY TO ANIMALS ACT, 1960

(59 of 1960)

As amended by Central Act 26 of 1982.

THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS ACT, 1960

(59 OF 1960)

As amended by Central Act 26 of 1982.


27. Exemptions : Nothing contained in this Chapter shall apply to -

(a) the training of animals for bonafide military or police purpose or the exhibition of any animals so trained; or

(b) any animals kept in any zoological garden or by any society or association which has for its principal object the exhibition of animals for educational or scientific purposes.

40. Indemnity : No suit, prosecution or other legal proceeding shall lie against any person who is, or who is deemed to be a public servant within the meaning of section 21 of the Indian Penal Code in respect of anything in good faith done or intended to be done under this Act.


Life is ruff for two star Indian police sniffer dogs who are now in disgrace after having puppies. Police in central India's Chhattisgarh state have suspended the bitches' trainers for dereliction of duty, BBC News informs.

The dog handlers said a lack of proper enclosures or kennels at the squad's headquarters was to blame. Labradors Seema and Liza have little time to dwell on their career setback - the proud mums have given birth to litters of seven and 10 respectively.

Seema and Liza have won lavish praise from bosses in the past for sniffing out caches of explosives and narcotics. But the two animals are now in the doghouse, as Chhattisgarh's police sniffer hounds are not supposed to become pregnant.

The commandant of police has ordered an inquiry into the "serious security lapse". He wants to know why the animals were not kept in protective enclosures. One of the trainers, Mohan Gupta, told the BBC that the blame lay with a lack of proper kennels at Chhattisgarh Armed Police's VIIth battalion.

He said the dog squad wing had broken doors and that "the bitches might have sneaked out or the street dogs might have strayed into the kennel".

"We were ignorant about the bitches conceiving till we noticed their stomachs swelling," he continued. I am just a trainer. How can I be held responsible for the bitches becoming pregnant?"

Complaints about the quality of facilities for police dog squads is just not an issue in Chhattisgarh. A couple of years ago a police squad in the eastern Indian state of Jharkhand was rocked by a similar controversy involving an amorous four-legged member of the team.

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